Epilepsy in Dogs and CBD for Treatment

CB Receptors in your dogs body
For most dogs, epilepsy is a lifelong disease requiring a regimented routine of care and treatment as prescribed by your veterinarian. A canine seizure is the result of abnormal electrical impulses in the brain which lead to sudden but short-term disturbances in your dog’s behavior and physical movements.

Dogs with idiopathic epilepsytypically have their first seizures between the ages of 6 months to 6 years. Though idiopathic epilepsy can occur in any breed, it is considered an inheritable disease in many breeds and in some breeds a genetic basis has been identified. Therefore, dogs diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy should not be used for breeding.

Commonly affected breeds include:

Labrador retrievers
Golden retrievers
Poodles
Keeshonds
Beagles
German shepherds
Dachshunds
Irish setters
Cocker spaniels

Symptoms
Prolonged seizures lasting more than 5 minutes or two or more consecutive seizures without full recovery are referred to as status epilepticus. This is a true emergency and you should seek immediate veterinary care for you pet. Two or more seizures in 24 hours are referred to as cluster seizures and are an indication for beginning anti-seizure medication.

It may be difficult to watch your pet have a seizure but most are of short duration and cause no permanent harm. Avoid being bitten by keeping your hands away from your pet’s mouth during a seizure. If it can be done safely, provide padding and move your pet away from stairs to prevent injury.
Treatment

Epilepsy can usually be managed with anti-convulsant drugs. If your veterinarian determines that your dog’s epilepsy is idiopathic, one or more of the following medications may be prescribed:

~ Phenobarbital helps reduce the frequency of your dog’s seizures and is the most prescribed medication for dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. It is generally a well-tolerated drug.

~ Potassium bromide is another seizure medication that may be added to your dog’s treatment, if she does not respond well to phenobarbital alone.
CBD ( Cannabidiol) as an alternative Treatment
For pets suffering from seizures, the use of Cannabidiol has been shown to be an effective, non-toxic form of treatment. Statistically speaking, a survey conducted by AHVMA that relied on pet-owner testimonials reported that between 61.8% and 95% of pet owners endorsed the benefits of treat products laced with CBD. According to another study titled, “Pharmacokinetics of cannabidiol in dogs,” researchers concluded that CBD has properties that can prevent convulsant and epileptic symptoms. 

Despite the studies and testimonials, it perhaps comes as no surprise that the use of CBD to treat pet health issues is being met with skepticism and concern. However, some of these concerns can perhaps be refuted when taking a closer look at CBD and where it comes from.

Though coming from the cannabis plant, CBD is the non-psychotropic hemp cultivar that is high in fiber and CBD, and low in THC. The latter (THC) actually has the potential to be harmful for pets. According to an article posted by Hawthorne Vet, the use of THC can bind to highly responsive receptors in a pet’s brain, leading to “static ataxia,” or behaviors that include the animal drooling, urinating excessively, and/or disorientation. Furthermore, if your pet is administered a product or drug that contains too much THC, there exists a risk for toxicity. Therefore, when considering the use of CBD on pets for health issues, it is important to avoid the use of THC and rather look for a product that contains only CBD, derived from hemp. 

When opting to utilize Cannabidiol to treat your pet’s seizures, it is important to start with the lowest dose possible and only then gradually increase the dosage, if necessary. Calculating the starting dose for your pet involves taking your pet’s weight in kilograms, determining the concentration of the CBD-product being used, and dividing the dosage across multiple administrations throughout the day. 

DOSES of CBD
In general, starting doses of CBD for pain and arthritis is 1 mg/10 lbs of body weight once to twice daily. I started my last dog on this dose to provided symptomatic pain relief for mouth cancer. I eventually increased his dose to 2 mg/10 lbs twice daily and he responded extremely well. 
So for pet seizures, we would be looking at a dose of  2 mg/10 lbs a day at the low end or 10 mg/10 lbs daily.
1. Talk to your vet! Your dog needs to stay on current ant-seizure meds and slowly wean off.
2. I would start for the 1st week on the low dose of 1 mg/10 lbs a day then increase to twice a day by the end of the week.
3. Then it’s a matter of lowering the conventional medications and seeing if the seizures are decreasing.
4. It may mean getting up to the higher doses of 2-5 mg/10 lbs a day.
Heal Your Pet At Home!

Best Wishes,

Dr Andrew Jones, DVM

*Please NOTE, Dr. Jones is not endorsing a specific CBD Hemp Product in this article.

The Truth about Pet Cancer FREE Doc-Series. Register Today!

This Docu-Series Begins April 4th!

Register now for FREE!

 

Also, Here is a current list of pet food recalls. 
Recalls – of which there are three types – are actions taken by a firm to remove a product from the market. Recalls may be conducted on a firm’s own initiative, by FDA request, or by FDA order under statutory authority.

Sugary Secret of Pet Treats

Sugary Secret of Pet Treats

 

Today’s pet treats aren’t the dog bones of your childhood. Over the past decade, a surprising ingredient has begun to appear on pet treat ingredient lists: sugar.Following the trend of sugar-laden children’s snacks, pet treat manufacturers are tapping into a dog’s sweet tooth to boost sales.

 “One of the key reasons I became involved with fighting pet obesity was when I began seeing sugar added to pet treats. I think if more pet owners were aware of this, they may choose their treats more carefully.” says veterinarian Dr. Ernie Ward, founder of the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) and author of “Chow Hounds: Why Our Dogs Are Getting Fatter – A Vet’s Plan to Save Their Lives” (2010 HCI). “When you have popular treats such as Snausages SnawSomes that list sugars as three of the first four ingredients, you know there’s a problem.”

And the problem is huge. APOP estimates that 45% of US dogs and 58% of cats are too heavy. That equals an estimated 89 million pets that are at high risk for developing conditions such as arthritis, diabetes, high blood pressure and more.

Ward says the problem is linked to money – lots of it. With US pet treat sales estimated to be nearly $2 billion in 2010, the treat bowl has turned golden. “Sugar is incredibly attractive to dogs. If a dog gobbles a treat quickly, an owner is more likely to give another – and another. This adds up to more sales – and profits. In the race for pet treat profits, our pets’ health is being bankrupted.”

Ward also contends that added sugar has behavioral consequences. “Numerous studies in rats demonstrate that overfeeding sugar can create symptoms similar to drug addiction. A dog’s daily sweet treat may be contributing to overeating and other undesirable behaviors. This is why I call today’s high-sugar treats ‘kibble crack.’”

Of course, pet treat manufacturers are quick to blame pet owners for the problem. After all, dogs and cats don’t buy or give these products themselves. Ward agrees – to a point. “Pet owners definitely have a feeding disorder when it comes to their pets. Ultimately it’s up to each owner to control how much they feed their pets. What I want to bring attention to is what ingredients are in pet treats – and why. Pet owners must begin to question why there is sugar in a treat that claims to help teeth.”

Ultimately both the pet food industry and Ward have pet’s best interest at heart. “Today we have some of the best pet foods and treats we’ve ever had. For that, I am grateful. At the same time, we’re seeing some of the unhealthiest products masquerading as wholesome and nutritious. It’s time we reveal the sugary secret that is contributing to obesity in pets.”

Dr. Ward’s Dirty Dozen – Popular Sugary Pet Treats:

  • Canine CarryOuts Chewotta  -Dextrose first ingredient
  • Snausages SnawSomes! Beef and Chicken Flavor -Sugars 3 of first 4 ingredients
  • Pedigree Jumbone Mini Snack Food for Small Dogs-Sugars 2 of 3 first ingredient
  • Petrodex Dental Treats for Cats- Dextrose second ingredient
  • Pedigree Jumbone- Sugar third ingredient
  • Milk Bone Essentials Plus Oral Care- Sugar third ingredient
  • Pup-Peroni Lean Beef Recipe- Sugar third ingredient
  • Science Diet Simple Essentials Treats Training Adult Treats with Real Beef- Sugar third ingredient
  • Cesar Softies Dog Treats- Sugar third ingredient
  • Milk-Bone Chewy Chicken Drumsticks- Sugar third ingredient
  • Meow Mix Moist Cat Treats- Corn syrup fourth ingredient
  • Pedigree Marrobone- Sugar third ingredient

Other common sugar-containing treats according to Dr. Ernie Ward:

  • Pedigree Jumbone – Sugar third ingredient
  • Beneful Snackin’ Slices – Sugar fourth ingredient
  • Pit’r Pat Fresh Breath Mint Flavored Cat Treats – Maltodextrin first ingredient
  • Three Dog Bakery Lick ‘n Crunch – Dextrose third ingredient
  • Beneful Snackin Slices – Sugar fourth ingredient
  • Busy Chewnola – Maltodextrin second ingredient
  • Exclusively Dog Vanilla Flavor Sandwich Creme Dog Cookies – Sugars first two ingredients
  • Canine Carryouts Dog Treats – Corn syrup second ingredient

For more information, visit www.PetObesityPrevention.com or www.DrErnieWard.com

Feng Shui Tip: Pets are Magical Healers

Gracie and Ty resting

What is it about pets that make us feel so happy? Is it their loyalty and unconditional love? Pets are really good life energy to have around and they enhance the Feng Shui of your living space, especially if you work outside the home and your home is left empty during the day.

 

They bring plenty of yang energy to counteract the yin energy of the quiet silence. Their good energy makes us feel upbeat and happy, especially when they greet us as we return home. Even it your pet or pets have torn up an item or had an accident in your home, they really are powerful Healers to have in your life. Always try to see the good in something ‘bad’ that they do. It is such good karma and energetically Balancing to be kind to your pets and have compassion for them. After all, they are helping us more than we realize!

~ Rev. Tiffany White Sage Woman

The picture above is my two dogs, Gracie and her son, Ty.