Christmas Births

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Editor’s Corner

Happy Holy Days

This is our last E-News issue of the year so I want to take this opportunity to wish you the most joyful holidays whatever and however you celebrate. You deserve a great celebration. The work you do for motherbaby is maybe the most important work being done in this world. How babies are born, how mothers are cared for affects how the world goes. I have great hope for motherbaby and families because the new knowledge of the microbiome and how it affects human babies for their entire life is an issue upon which change can be made.

Because you work so diligently for families, I hope you will consider subscribing to Midwifery Today. We make the greatest effort to bring you articles, poems, art and photos that will help inform and inspire your calling. We have wonderful authors such as Michel Odent, Sister MorningStar, Robin Lim, Susun Weed, Elizabeth Davis and many more. Also, please consider writing for us. You will receive a year subscription if your article is published. You can subscribe here.

~ Jan Tritten, mother of Midwifery Today

Jan Tritten is the founder, editor-in-chief and mother of Midwifery Today magazine. She became a midwife in 1977 after the amazing homebirth of her second daughter. Her mission is to make loving midwifery care the norm for birthing women and their babies throughout the world. Meet Jan at our conferences around the world, or join her online, as she works to transform birth practices around the world.

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Featured Article

My Most Memorable Christmas Births

My most memorable Christmas birth was a beautiful waterbirth, reminiscent of “Silent night, holy night.” It was a crisp, clear night, just a few days after Christmas. “The moon on the breast of the new fallen snow, gave the luster of midday…”

The family had moved the dining table into a spare bedroom and put the tub up next to the Christmas tree. It was a real tree, still smelling of pine. The only light in the room came from the lights on the tree. The baby slid into the world serenely and reverently and mewed a content new baby cry. All was well with the world.

To make it even more memorable, when we turned on the kitchen light to examine the placenta, there was a second smaller lobe attached to the main placenta. It had a tiny string of an umbilical cord leading off of it, ending in a small empty sac.

Then there was the primip who was in labor on Christmas Eve. In those days, my husband and I split up the Christmas duties with one of us taking the younger kids to the children’s mass and pageant on Christmas Eve while the other one of us stayed home and cooked dinner and then attended midnight mass with the older kids. The one who had gone to church earlier put the younger kids to bed and started putting presents under the tree.

So, this particular Christmas, I was planning to take the younger kids to the children’s mass, but I was still at the birth, so Hubby had to take them while the older kids stayed home and made supper. Surely, I thought, I’d be home in time to take them to the midnight mass. But no; remember, this was a primip. So the older kids had to walk to church while hubby stayed home with the littles. Meanwhile, my client labored on through the night. She had her baby in the morning. I stayed just long enough to see them settled and nursing well, not bleeding much. I looked at my watch and realized that if I left soon, I would be just in time for the 9 am Christmas morning mass, but there wasn’t enough time to go home and change first. Well, I got to church in the nick of time, sat down and promptly feel asleep!

Then there was the time my fellow midwife called me in labor, just after we finished opening Christmas presents. Her son was born that evening. I attended his wedding last year!

And I’ll never forget the time when all the kids were little (we only had three or four back then). We had procrastinated wrapping Christmas presents and as luck would have it, I had 8 births in 10 days, right around Christmas, so when I was called to a birth on Christmas Eve, most of the presents were still unwrapped. I got home at 3 am Christmas morning, just as Hubby was wrapping the last of the presents. We vowed to never wait to wrap presents again, and we haven’t!

That birth was memorable not only because of the present wrapping fiasco, but this woman did the opposite of what most women do. She would relax between contractions and then pace through each contraction. When it was over, I had rug burns on my knees from scooting behind her with a towel as she paced while the baby descended the birth canal. Thankfully, on the contraction that brought the baby out, she finally stopped and leaned on a chair as baby came out.

~ Marlene Waechter, CPM, is a pioneer Catholic midwife who has served in southern Ohio since the 1970s. She is mother of seven grown children, including five home-born, one of whom was born in water. She is also grandmother to 15 grandchildren, including two HBACs. Besides being a long-time contributor to Midwifery Today, Marlene has co-authored the book, The Joyful Mysteries of Childbirth, a practical and spiritual guide for Christian families.

 

Q: Tell us your Christmas birth story.

— Midwifery Today

A: My favorite Christmas birth happened years ago. In the wee morning hours, I was called to attend a labor on Christmas during an ice and snowstorm. We all drove very slowly to the birth and arrived in time to attend the birth of a 5+ lb girl into a family that had four boys. The parents were so surprised and elated they finally had a girl that they all were shouting Hallelujah. I felt like it was an angel announcement and baby, of course, was named Noelle. I drove to my family’s Christmas dinner with snowflakes falling and hot chocolate in my belly.

— Maryl Smith

A: The very first birth in my birth center was on Christmas! The mama was a VBAC hopeful and had transferred care to me three weeks prior. Then she birthed her precious baby in the wee hours of Christmas morning. It really was magical. Everything outside was so quiet (I’m in downtown Dallas) because all the families were home asleep…together. I got finished in time to get home and shower, slip into bed, close my eyes and have my door burst open with excited children yelling and laughing for Christmas! I got up, had coffee, opened presents and then finally got to nap.

— Kristine Tawater

A: I know a lass who at 23 years old was 3 weeks overdue. On Christmas Eve, her wise grandma made her walk for miles and miles looking for nutmeg that the grandmother then put in the young lady’s large champagne glass without her noticing at their family Christmas celebrations. The young lady left the party and got into bed and woke a few hours later all wet. After three contractions, she headed to hospital as the contractions kept coming back to back. Her mother, her grandmother and her doula all joined her at the hospital.

The contractions came and came, one after the other, nonstop and pinching her back, with no rest or respite. At 4 pm the midwives changed and in came an energetic lady with a very strong accent. She put in a catheter and got kicked and sworn at in Spanish, which she didn’t understand. Finally, a cone-headed baby was born. He was welcomed by the three generations of women behind him, his great great-grandmother, his grandmother, his mother, his godmother doula, his daddy and the tinsel-covered midwives with strong vibes. He is a prince amongst his family and his friends. And this 25th of December, he will be 25 years old and will be surrounded by his family and by his very proud mother, who will never forget every moment of that Christmas day, as she is me!

— Paula Gallardo

A: During my very first Christmas as a newly graduated midwife (I got my diploma on October 1), I worked at a birth center in Copenhagen. A young woman from Greenland came in to have her second child. Her first had been born earlier in the year in January, and this, her second baby, was to be born on Christmas morning! She came in early in the morning and the birth was speedy and beautiful. The mother had such a lovely spirit. Just after noon time, she announced that she was ready to go home again. She had put the Christmas duck in the oven on low heat before leaving for the birth center, and she was expecting dinner guests that evening! She promised me to lie on the couch and let her mother do the rest of the cooking and serve her dinner. I met her again a couple of years later; she told me that Christmas evening had been the best in her life.

— Tine Greve

 

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Breech Birth by Midwifery Today

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Editor’s Corner

Breech Birth

It is interesting that breech birth has become such a controversial issue. For centuries, it was considered normal and just another form of birth. It is surely something one needs extra training for and not something to be taken lightly. That is why we offer classes on breech birth at every conference. Babies can turn breech easily, so it is important to always be prepared for this possibility. Since most doctors no longer do breech birth, the medical world is losing its skill in the art of breech; the only option then is to have a cesarean or to find one of the few midwives willing to assist in a vaginal breech birth.

My dear friend Cornelia Enning, one of our conference speakers, does a class on breech in water because she says this is the best way to help breech babies. Cornelia says that breech birth in water is safer, in part because it improves fetal oxygenation by increasing uterine blood supply during immersion. Frank breeches need no special maneuvers because water alters the effects of gravity. Mobility of the mother in water allows better interaction of the baby through the pelvis and any maneuvers that may be required are easier in water. You can attend Cornelia’s breech workshop at our conference in Finland.

~ Jan Tritten, mother of Midwifery Today

Jan Tritten is the founder, editor-in-chief and mother of Midwifery Today magazine. She became a midwife in 1977 after the amazing homebirth of her second daughter. Her mission is to make loving midwifery care the norm for birthing women and their babies throughout the world. Meet Jan at our conferences around the world, or join her online, as she works to transform birth practices around the world.

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Featured Article

The Best Dream Ever: Otto’s Breech Birth

I woke up feeling tired and grumpy. By 8 pm I started having period-type pains, which came in irregular waves and were completely bearable, so I didn’t think much of them really.

My husband, Fin, fell asleep at about 11:30 pm and I tried sleeping, too, but couldn’t. I was suddenly really hungry and thirsty, so I went to the kitchen and ate some food and had a drink. The contractions were getting more intense, but still bearable—I really didn’t want to wake the midwives until I was completely sure that this was the real thing.

At around 1:30 am I asked Fin to get me a sick bucket and a hot water bottle. I think it was at this point that I realized this might be the real thing. I stayed in bed a while longer, just keeping calm and breathing through the contractions. I then got up and really needed the loo and had a huge contraction on the toilet. I was still breathing through them, but I started to get quite vocal and loud. I called Fin and he rushed out of bed and said, “Okay I’m going to call the midwives.” I remember thinking that I was making a bit of a pathetic fuss!

Just after 2 am I had two enormous contractions while standing up with my hands on the arm of the sofa. I was very vocal through these (read: “I shouted my face off!”). I was definitely on a different plane of consciousness and my body was taking over. When Fin was off the phone to the midwives he said he was going to call a cab so we could head to St. Mary’s Hospital for the birth, but after another big contraction I said, “You need to call an ambulance now!” I was still leaning on the sofa, and after the second big contraction I said to Fin, “This can’t be right—I am having urges to push!” One more contraction made me yell out, “I can feel something!” I put my fingers behind me and there was something, a bottom or maybe a leg, just starting to present itself. Fin got on the phone to 999.

I was now on all fours on the floor with my face on the sofa. It was at this point that another quite vocal contraction woke my 10-year-old daughter, and in the middle of a contraction, I became aware of her in the doorway. When that one was over, I didn’t want her to be scared (she wasn’t anyway!) and also I wanted her to feel part of things so I smiled and said, “‘Hi Star! Come and hold my hand!” which she did, although she was keeping a very curious eye on what was happening at the other end too!

The paramedics (five of them!) bundled into my flat and stood in a semicircle behind me. I had two contractions which pushed the baby’s bottom (still in the sac) out, but I felt it go back in again. I felt the bottom come out and go back in again twice, and it must have been during the second one that the sac broke and then the next contraction pushed the bottom out fully. The legs and torso followed, and then I felt the arms ping out one by one—a very odd sensation! Star said that seeing her brother’s body out while his head was still in was the coolest thing she’d ever seen in her life.

I suddenly realized that there were no midwives there to advise me whether to push with the next contraction or what to do, and I saw two paths ahead of me: either I could panic, tense up and try to push, or I could relax, trust my body and see what happened. The contraction, quite a mild one, came. I felt my vagina relax and get bigger to allow the head through, then close up when he was out. Otto Gaze-O’Brien was born at 2:33 am on November 9, 2010.

I had no stitches or anything. Bizarrely, it didn’t even hurt afterwards.

The paramedics passed Otto through my legs (I was still on all fours) so I could have a rather awkward cuddle. They tried to cut the cord straight away, but I refused, as I wanted it to stop pulsing.

Our midwife, Liz Noonan, arrived at our flat about 10 minutes after our baby was born, and Fin, Star and I sat on the sofa giggling like school children and asking each other, “Did that actually just happen?!” It felt like a dream—like the best dream ever. About 30 minutes after I gave birth to Otto, Star watched me squat to deliver the placenta. She said, “Mama, that was beautiful. It was…it was majestic!”

~ Ezmë Gaze
Excerpted from “The Best Dream Ever: Otto’s Breech Birth,” Midwifery Today, Issue 106
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Bring breech birth information with you wherever you go.
MT e-book Download Breech Birth, a collection of 15 articles by some of the greatest  minds in the natural childbirth world. Articles in this e-book include  “Breech Birth from a Primal Health Research Perspective” by Michel    Odent, “Instinctual Breech Birth” by Sister MorningStar and “Three      Surprise Breeches” by Ina May Gaskin. Available on Amazon or on   Smashwords in a variety of formats.

Birth without Violence

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The Art of Midwifery

Suffering in childbirth need not be the norm, for without drugs and without medical interventions imposing iatrogenic risks, healthy, well-supported women, carrying healthy babies, may make the passage of childbirth with dignity, surrounded by people of their choice, with joy, grace and even pleasure. The gentle birth movement advocates for the basic human right of women to labor and deliver their own babies with respect from their health care providers, with support for their choices and privacy. Furthermore, families and wise health care providers are advocating for the rights of babies to be handled in a way that does not impair their future health, well-being, intelligence and longevity, e.g., delayed umbilical cord severance and skin-to-skin uninterrupted contact with mother following birth. Clearly, much of the trauma experienced by mothers in childbirth and babies at birth is preventable.

Robin Lim
Excerpted from “When Pregnancy Goes South: Keeping Birth Gentle,” Midwifery Today, Issue 113
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Editor’s Corner

Birth without Violence

Birth without Violence is the title of a book written by Frenchman Frederick Leboyer. It was translated into English in 1975. He encouraged a warm bath for the baby and gentle treatment. It is full of beautiful photos as well as violent photos of babies. Though we don’t talk about the “Leboyer Bath” anymore, violence to babies is still rampant. As we head into our “Birth Is a Human Rights Issue” conference in Strasbourg, it is important to keep the baby in mind. We are dealing with two lives. For the baby, birth sets the stage of her/his whole life. Birth can also alter the course of the mother’s life, either negatively or positively.

One thing Leboyer didn’t understand is that taking the baby away from the mother to do a bath wasn’t really the best thing to be doing. The knowledge of the microbiome wasn’t available during his time; now even science backs up the idea that the baby belongs with the mother after birth. We have enough information now to practice for the optimal health of both mother and baby physically, emotionally and spiritually. We just need to do it.

~ Jan Tritten, mother of Midwifery Today

Jan Tritten is the founder, editor-in-chief and mother of Midwifery Today magazine. She became a midwife in 1977 after the amazing homebirth of her second daughter. Her mission is to make loving midwifery care the norm for birthing women and their babies throughout the world. Meet Jan at our conferences around the world, or join her online, as she works to transform birth practices around the world.

 

Featured Article

Violence, the Human Experience and Midwifery

In my year working as a midwife in Guatemala, I became acutely aware of the role of violence in everyday life and how deeply it affects birth. Since then, my quest has intensified to understand violence and its relationship to midwifery and to learn effective ways for addressing it. When I use the word violence I am speaking of the use of force or aggression to control, punish or impose one’s will on another or on nature. This is distinct from the use of force as a means to protect.

A woman is experiencing violence when she is coerced into medical procedures that can do more harm than good, such as an induction or a cesarean, and is then shamed or threatened if she dares question her doctor. When a newborn is separated from his mother at birth, or her umbilical cord is cut before she receives the full return of her own blood from the placenta, or when he is strapped to a metal table and the most sensitive part of his sex organ is cut off without the benefit of anesthesia, he or she is experiencing violence as an introduction to life.

These types of violence are so pervasive in Western society that they actually appear normal. It has become so prevalent, in fact, that a term has been created to describe it: obstetrical violence. For me, the perennial questions are “Why?” and “What can be done about it?” I am left searching for answers that make sense.

If we are to address violence, we must go to the source. I do not want violence, and my way of dealing with my distaste for violence has always been to avoid it wherever possible. I became a midwife in order to promote peace in the world. I have been relating to violence as if it were the enemy of peace. Yet I now sense myself opening to a clearer vision: embracing the whole of the human experience with violence as a teacher.

What does violence have to teach us about the experience of being human? Someone who is acting violently is someone who has temporarily lost touch with their own humanity. In comparison, we say that someone who acts out of love and care is someone who acts from the heart. In our hearts we experience our human vulnerability—our emotions and our need for love, care, connection, meaning and contribution. Those feelings and needs are real and they are at the “heart” of what makes us human.

Sarah Proechel
Excerpted from “Violence, the Human Experience and Midwifery,” Midwifery Today, Issue 102
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Conference Chatter

Online classes

We are very excited to begin offering online classes. We have purchased our platforms and done our first test class. That was an amazing class on the microbiome with Fernando Molina. If you would like to take that class, it is archived and available at no charge here: Adobe Connect

We are planning many more classes. We will be doing a beginning midwifery series for aspiring and student midwives and excellent practical classes for all midwives such as Shoulder Dystocia, New & Old: Techniques for Controlling & Preventing Hemorrhage, Prolonged Labor and many more. We will also have an array of other types of classes of interest to birth practitioners. We hope to do classes for parents as well because our wonderful speakers can speak to all people! Watch this space for updates and details. If you have specific classes you would like us to consider, e-mail me.

Toward better birth!

~  Jan Tritten

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Midwifery Today Conferences

Strasbourg conferenceAttend a full-day class on birth complications with Gail Hart, Tine Greve and Diane Goslin

In the morning, the focus will be on shoulder dystocia. Our teachers will demonstrate effective treatments and look in-depth at more than 14 maneuvers. They will also discuss causes, incidence rates, prevention and solutions. The afternoon session will cover second stage issues such as prolonged rupture of membranes, failure to progress, abnormal labor patterns and non-medical intervention.

Learn more about the Strasbourg, France, conference.


What is the Heart and Science of Birth?

Eugene conferenceAttend our conference in Eugene, Oregon, next April and find out! You will have the opportunity to learn practical skills and discover important new information, including information about the Microbiome. And, as always, our hope is that you return to your practice refreshed, renewed and ready to help moms and babies.

Learn more about the Eugene, Oregon, conference.