What Role Does Mucus Play in Digestion?

Woman holding model of human intestines in front of body on white background

For those that suffer from allergies or sinus infections, you may get the impression that mucus is a bad thing. There is even OTC medicines to help remove the excess of mucus. However, what if I told you that mucus is very important and vital to our body and health?

Mucus plays a hugely important role in digestion, in addition to helping establish the overall health of other areas of your body.

In this article we’ll focus just on how mucus helps in mechanical digestion, and why you need to make sure that your body has a suitable amount.

Why does it help?

The first question to answer regarding mucus and its role in digestion is why mucus is a helpful substance. Mucus, though it doesn’t look like it, helps destroy bacteria and viruses, in addition to trapping particles, preventing water loss, lubricating the movement of materials through your body, and protects all the surfaces it touches from damage.

You have mucus in your mouth, in the form of saliva, and even in your eyes. The viscosity of the mucus depends on where it’s located in your body. In your nose, for examples, it’s thicker in order to fight against the potential viruses, dirt, and other irritants which can easily enter the nose. With your digestive tract, however, mucus is a bit different.

How does mucus help digestion?

Your stomach is lined by a protective layer of mucus, which is responsible for creating the enzymes that help your body digest proteins. Additionally, the mucus lining your stomach helps prevent your stomach lining from the negative effects of excessive exposure to acid or pepsin.

Now, as for your digestive tract specifically – mucus helps there as well. Since mucus works to lubricate items in your body for easy movement from one area of the body to another, it’s important to have enough in your intestinal tract.

The intestines can easily be perforated or otherwise harmed by sharp objects you’ve eaten that haven’t been completely ground down yet (potato chips, crackers, etc.). Mucus coats these objects so they flow through your intestines at a much more productive rate, ensuring that your body is able to process the food you eat as efficiently as possible.

Mucus from beginning to end:

Now that you can see how mucus is important in many different aspects of your health, let’s look at the process it plays from beginning to end in your digestive system.

First, the saliva in your mouth (a form of mucus) breaks down your food, fights bacteria in your mouth, and removes plaque from your teeth. Then the mucus lining your throat lubricates the food as it enters your stomach.

There, the protective mucus membrane on the lining of your stomach protects it from acid exposure. Once it’s done in your stomach, the food moves to your intestines where it’s once again coated in mucus to move freely through your entire digestive tract.

It may not be outwardly apparent, but without mucus it’s easy to see that our bodies wouldn’t function as well as they could.

~ Rev. Tiffany White Sage Woman

http://goldylocks.mynsp.com

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7 Common Signs of Nutrient Deficiency

Food alone may not provide sufficient micronutrients for preventing deficiency.

This study from the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition analyzed 70 athlete’s diets. Every single diet was deficient in at least three nutrients. Some diets were missing up to fifteen nutrients! Another study they performed showed that people following one of four popular diet plans (including Atkins, South Beach, and the DASH diet) were also very likely to be micronutrient deficient, particularly in six key micronutrients:

  • Vitamin B7
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin E
  • Chromium
  • Iodine
  • Molybdenum

Similarly, the United States Department of Agriculture says the majority of Americans are deficient in many of the same nutrients and are not meeting the required daily amount of things like vitamin E, folate, calcium and magnesium.

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So how do you know if you’re deficient? First of all, if you’re not eating A LOT of fruits and vegetables, especially greens, then you are probably deficient in a lot of these areas. There are also many different symptoms that could tell you you are deficient in some critical nutrient. Here are 7 of them:

1. Poor Night Vision

Vitamin A, known as retinol, is essential for promoting good vision and overall eye health. It also helps to maintain healthy skin and soft tissues throughout the body.

2. Cracks at the Corners of the Mouth

This is more likely to occur for those following vegan and vegetarian diets because it’s harder to get sufficient zinc, iron and B12.

3. Sores or Discoloration of the Mouth and Tongue

Water-soluble B-vitamins are essential for the health of the mouth and tongue. Unfortunately, the body doesn’t store them, so we have to constantly replenish them.

4. Weak, Spotted or Ridged Nails

These are common signs of a deficiency in zinc, an important trace mineral needed for the proper function of the immune system. Zinc also serves an important role in cell division and growth.

5. Poor Blood Clotting

Essential for normal blood clotting, vitamin K also plays a vital role in bone mineralization and cell growth. Lack of vitamin K can result in bruising, frequent nosebleeds and brittle bones.

6. Weak Muscles and Bones

In advanced cases it’s called rickets (for children) or osteomalacia (for adults), but it boils down to a deficiency in vitamin D, an essential nutrient for growth, health and maintenance of the structural system.

7. Frequent Cramps in the lower legs or ‘Restless Leg’

Magnesium, calcium and potassium support proper muscle development and growth. Lack of these important nutrients can cause persistent discomfort in the feet, calves and back of the leg.

nutrition-deficiency

~ Rev. Tiffany White Sage Woman

http://goldylocks.mynsp.com

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25 Ways to Increase Fiber Daily

Fiber is one of those often-overlooked necessities.

You know you need it, and you like it when you have it, but it doesn’t top the list the way Protein or Omega-3 does.

Fiber is pretty important to supporting cardiovascular and digestive health, so why the fiber hate? Because when most of us think fiber, we think fibrous, and cardboard-esque. Not very appetizing. Luckily there are a lot of ways to add fiber to your diet without compromising on taste, texture, or appeal. Here are 25 ways you can increase your daily fiber intake.

  1. Use whole fruit: It is tempting to use fruit juice in your morning smoothie or protein drink, but if you drop a whole apple or orange in your high powered blender, rather than the juice, you are going to get as much as 3 grams more fiber.
  2. Sprinkle on the flax seed or chia: You can stir a few spoonfuls into cereal, granola, yogurt, etc, to add extra fiber to what you are already eating.
  3. Sub nectar for juice: It has more pulp and more fiber, giving you a fiber boost with each glass.
  4. Eat nut butters: Almond butter, cashew butter, and other nut butters can be spread on toast, pancakes, and more for an additional few grams of fiber, a tasty treat, and a great dose of healthy fats. Just look for the lower sugar options to keep it healthy.
  5. Drink cocoa instead of coffee. While the caffeine boost of coffee is great, cocoa has a lot more fiber, as much as 3 g per cup!

 

Need more fiber? Try Nature’s Sunshine: Everybody’s Fiber or Psyllium Hulls Combination

 

Also:

  1. Eat more beans. Throw a few spoonfuls into your favorite soup, lentils and beans have a good amount of fiber.
  2. Add spice to your dish. A teaspoon of oregano or basil can add a gram of fiber.
  3. Use sesame seed buns instead of plain.
  4. Choose whole wheat over white flour. This can add more fiber per serving for whatever you are eating.
  5. Add the greens. Cabbage, kale, spinach, etc. all have fiber, so stack your sandwich high, put some on your burger or dog, and eat it on the side.
  6. Snack on popcorn. Popcorn has a lot more fiber than a bag of potato chips, so next time you need a salty snack, choose popcorn!
  7. Eat nuts and dried fruits. When you have the choice, pick up a handful of trail mix for a snack rather than a bar or square, the mix will have about twice as much fiber!
  8. Choose sweet potato instead of white. They have 2 grams more fiber.
  9. Add a side of cooked veggies. Broccoli, cauliflower, and carrots are all great for adding fiber, and cooking them makes the fiber more readily available to your body!
  10. Choose berries. Add fresh sliced berries instead of syrups, and when you have the option pick raspberries over strawberries or blueberries as they boast nearly twice the amount of fiber.
  11. Eat pears. If looking for a quick snack, try a pear, preferably an Asian pear, as they have as much as 5 grams of fiber, and can be eaten raw, with a nut butter, or prepared a number of ways. Just be sure to eat the skin.
  12. Try oatmeal and oat bran. Swap out your regular breakfast for a steamy cup of oatmeal for a great fiber increase. Top with berries or bananas for even more fiber.
  13. Artichokes are low calorie and have a ton of fiber. Make a soup, dip in a low calorie dip, or make into a dip, and enjoy!
  14. Add green peas. Keeping a bag of frozen green peas on hand is a great way to add fiber to your diet without fuss. Stir them into macaroni and cheese, throw some atop a salad, or add them as a side dish to any meal for about 9 grams of fiber per cup.
  15. Lentils and Bulgar: Experiment with lentils and whole grains you may not be familiar with. Try them in your regular recipes for added fiber and flavor.
  16. Squash. There are so many varieties of squash, from spaghetti, which makes a great substitute for grain noodles, to butternut, which makes excellent soup. Squash is packed with fiber, so add more squash to your diet.
  17. Vegetables: Add vegetables to everything you can, from an extra helping in your morning omelets, to veggies in your spaghetti sauce. They are a great source of insoluble fiber.
  18. Go ethnic: American foods often have lower fiber than ethnic cuisines, so try something from Mexico, the Middle East, or the Mediterranean, which usually have beans, lentils, and other good sources of fiber.
  19. Up your dips: Dipping is fun, but try hummus, bean dips, and artichoke dips which are both full of fiber as opposed to a dressing.
  20. Add a little when baking. Give your cookies, cakes, breads, and muffins more fiber by subbing in some whole-wheat flour and oats.

 

~ Rev. Tiffany White Sage Woman, Nature’s Sunshine Independent Distributor and Holistic Health Practitioner

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Today at 2 pm ET / 11 am PT, Professor Shizumi & Dr. Crimi are the Special Guests on the Livining in Partnership with Spirit Radio Show with host Ingrid Turner.

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Ingrid Turner

Goldylocks Productions Presents the Living in Partnership with Spirit Show with Ingrid Turner, Today, Tuesday, 12 July 2016 at 2 pm ET / 11 am PT.

Ingrid Turner is a Spiritual Medium, Spiritual Coach, and Diviner.  She connects with loved ones, spirit guides, spiritual energies, and the higher self to help her clients heal, connect with their authentic spiritual path, and live in their power.  She also runs coaching programs for individuals and groups, where she helps outside-the-box seekers connect with Spirit directly, and build their own spiritual structures.

The theme of the show is living a spiritual life in partnership with Spirit in every capacity of your life, and however you define Spirit.  Be that spiritual beings, energies, or God.  Every week we will have a topic, a guest relevant to that topic, and an opportunity for listeners to call in to ask a question from Spirit, get spiritual guidance, or ask questions of our guest and their story.

http://www.ingridhturner.com

 

Special Guests: Professor Shizumi and Dr. Crimi

Professor Shizumi Crimi

Shizumi is co-owner of the Hikari Ryuza Center, where a group of doctors and professionals specialize in health and wellness coaching, nutrition, martial arts fitness, and holistic healing with the ancient Japanese healing art Seifukujitsu. She is the head health and wellness coach at the Center, helping clients lose weight, get in better shape and improve their dietary and lifestyle habits. She attended the Health Coaching Program from the Institute of Integrative Nutrition, where she studied over 100 dietary theories, practical lifestyle management techniques, and learned innovative coaching methods with some of the worlds leading health and wellness experts, such as Deepak Chopra, Dr. David Katz, Director of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center, Dr. Walter Willett, Chair of Nutrition at Harvard University, and many other medical professionals at the top of their field. In addition, she is a certified Seifukujitsu practitioner, and has a Bachelor in Oriental Medicine and an Associate in Social and Behavioral Science.

Shizumi is an accomplished Martial Artist, holding a Shichidan (7th degree black belt) in Hikari Ryuza Bujutsu® and a Lakan-isa (1st degree black belt) in Senkotiros Arnis.  She holds the title of Professor in her art. She has been training with Senior Grandmaster Crimi for twenty years, and is now co-owner and operator of the Hikari Ryuza Center in Penn Valley, CA. Along with her teacher and Hikari Ryuza Center® co-owner Dr. Crimi, Shizumi volunteers for the community as a DT Instructor (Defensive Tactics) for Grandmaster Crimi’s POST (Peace Officer Standards and Training) certified defensive tactics courses, teaches classes for Nevada County’s volunteer deputies and retired law enforcement, and teaches Women’s Self Defense course (Hikari Ryuza Fujin Goshin No Maki®), which has trained over 1,000 women. In 2001, the United World Martial Arts Federation awarded her Outstanding Sensei.

Dr. Crimi

Dr. Crimi has a Doctorate in Oriental Medicine from the University of Indiana: School of Oriental Medicine, and has been a practitioner for 45 years. He made his medical education official under Professor Estes, who was a Master of Seifukujitsu, an ancient Japanese healing art, and Danzan Ryu Jujitsu. Dr. Crimi rounded out his practice with Nihon Kaifuku Amma (oriental bodywork), Acupuncture, Acupressure, and extensive work with herbs, supplements and nutrition. Since 1977, Dr. Crimi has run the Hikari Ryuza Center®, a successful Martial Arts, health, and wellness center in Penn Valley, CA. He partners with a group of doctors and coaches to provide a multi-pronged, holistic approach to health and wellness, driving care and treatment “from the inside out.”

He has been passionately immersed in Martial Arts for nearly 60 years and holds the title of Senior Grandmaster. He holds the rank of Kudan (9th degree black belt) in Danzan Ryu Jujutsu, and is the Shodai (Founder) and a Judan (10th degree black belt) in Hikari Ryuza Bujutsu®, which incorporates Danzan Ryu Jujutsu, Kenpo Karate and Senkotiros Arnis. Senior Grandmaster Crimi has been teaching Martial Arts to students of all ages at the Hikari Ryuza Center® for nearly 40 years.

In addition to adult and children’s classes, for the last 35 years Senior Grandmaster Crimi has volunteered his time as a DT (Defensive Tactics) instructor, training Northern California law enforcement through his POST (Peace Officer Standards and Training) certified defensive tactics course, as well as offering free classes to volunteer and retired deputies. He also developed a comprehensive women’s self defense course, Hikari Ryuza Fujin Goshin No Maki®, which has trained over 1,000 women throughout the county.

http://www.ryuzado.com

Call in Number is 657-383-1895

Please unblock your phone number if you wish to get on air with Ingrid, Prof. Shizumi and Dr. Crimi. Press 1 to get onto the Host Que to ask your question, otherwise you will remain in Listen Mode only. 

Listen to the Live Radio Show and participate in Chat, via computer, here: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/goldylocksproductions2/2016/07/12/living-in-partnership-with-spirit

The link is above is not only for the Live Radio Show but for the Archived Show as well, once the Live Show is over.

 

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Sale on Nature’s Sunshine HistaBlock® (90 caps) $2 off. 3/1 – 3/31

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NSP HistaBlock

Benefits:

  • Supports the body in times of respiratory stress.
  • Supports the body’s efforts to maintain a healthy mucous membrane.
  • Supports free breathing and may help reduce unpleasant symptoms associated with irritants.

How It Works:

HistaBlock provides nutrients that support healthy respiratory function as the body battles irritants, pollutants and toxins. Stinging nettle provides well-known support against seasonal airborne substances. This formula provides antioxidant strength to help stabilize mast cells.

The antioxidant quercetin has been used for its reputed effects in supporting the respiratory system. Quercetin may help stabilize cells that release compounds when exposed to irritants. Bromelain is an enzyme that works to help reduce the swelling of mucous membranes during times of respiratory stress. Bitter orange contains synephrine, which helps the body support open airways.

Ingredients:

Nettle leaves, quercetin, Bitter orange fruit and bromelain.

Recommended Use:

Take 2 capsules with a meal twice daily.

 

To take advantage of this Sale, click here: HistaBlock Sale

 

~ Rev. Tiffany White Sage Woman

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Does Baking Soda contain Aluminum?

Yesterday, I watched a video on Facebook on how a woman suggested adding a pinch of baking soda into your coffee to reduce the acidic level of your coffee. She says that she uses a brand of baking soda that does not contain aluminum.

This got me thinking….does the baking soda we have contain aluminum? I looked at the ingredients on the label…and no, it does not. We use good ole Arm & Hammer Baking Soda.

I decided to research this online and found the article below. By the way, I am going to try the pinch of baking soda in my coffee to reduce the acidic level.I will comment below on the results.

Enjoy!

~ Rev. Tiffany White Sage Woman

Baking soda

I think we can all agree…

… that baking soda is pretty magical stuff. Of course it’s what makes our baked goods rise and get all fluffy, but it’s also good for deodorizing stinky stuff, cleaning carpet spots, making DIY cleaning pastes, and scrubbing messy ovens too.

When I hear the word ‘aluminum’ in regards to my food or personal care products, I definitely start paying attention, because aluminum is not something I want to be using or consuming on a regular basis.

What’s the Big Deal with Aluminum?

Aluminum is a common addition to some processed foods (especially certain baking mixes) and hygiene products (such as anti-perspirent deodorant).

The problem?

Aluminum is a neurotoxin that may lead to neurological disorders (1), and certain studies have even linked it to Alzheimer’s disease (2).

There’s still some controversy in the scientific community over the exact health dangers of aluminum, but the available evidence is enough to make me say ‘No thanks.’ Therefore, I make a point of avoiding aluminum cookware and any food or personal care products that contain the metal.

Since I don’t cook with processed food items, avoiding aluminum in that space is pretty easy. BUT, there is an ingredient that I frequently use in my kitchen that can be a big offender when it comes to aluminum—>

Good ol’ baking powder.

The Difference Between Baking Soda and Baking Powder

This is where it can get a little confusing–since baking soda and baking powder are both white, powdery substances that we use in baking. But there IS a difference:

Baking soda is 100% sodium bicarbonate. It comes from soda ash, which can be produced synthetically or harvested from natural sources.  Generally, recipes that call for baking soda also call for some sort of acid, which helps to boost the leavening process and remove the slightly bitter taste that baking soda sometimes lends to recipes.

On the other hand, Baking powder contains some sodium bicarbonate, but also has other ingredients that act as acidifying agents. This means that you don’t have to add extra acid to your recipes to get the leavening action. The acidifying agents can come in the form of cream of tartar or an aluminum-based acid (3).

**Ding Ding Ding**

And that’s where aluminum makes its entrance.

Thankfully, not all baking powders contain aluminum-based acids–it just depends on the manufacturer. It’s easy to avoid the aluminum varieties– simply look for the “aluminum-free” designation on the label.

But what about baking soda?

Baking Soda was Framed

The concern over baking soda is actually a case of mistaken identity.

Baking soda, by definition, is sodium bicarbonate, and there is no reason for it to contain an acidifying agent–aluminum-based or otherwise.

Lemme say that one more time–

Baking soda does not contain aluminum.

I even called the Arm and Hammer (the “famous” baking soda company) to double check, and they stated very definitively that their baking soda is 100% sodium bicarbonate and contains zero aluminum.

Whew. It’s kinda nice to have one less thing to worry about, huh?

It seems that this whole confusion started because certain manufacturers have labeled their product as “aluminum-free baking soda.”

That would lead one to believe that there IS indeed varieties of baking soda that do contain aluminum, however, that is not the case. I believe the reasoning behind this labeling was because they were probably getting a bazillion calls each day from people who were confused by the difference between baking soda and baking powder–so they stuck the label on there to put everyone’s mind at ease.

However, all baking soda is aluminum-free, even if it is not labeled as such.

So to Answer the Question…

No, baking soda does not contain aluminum, but some varieties of baking powder can.

So look for aluminum-free baking powder the next time you are at the store, but don’t worry about the baking soda. You can buy the big bags of the cheap stuff–no problem.

~ Original article: http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2014/01/baking-soda-aluminum.html

Tonight at 8 pm ET, the Spiritual Insight Radio Show with host Rev. Tiffany White Sage Woman. Topic: Where Do I Start with my Holistic Health?

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Goldylocks Productions Presents the Spiritual Insight Show with Rev. Tiffany White Sage Woman, Tonight, Tuesday, 1 March 2016 at 8 pm ET.

Reverend Tiffany White Sage Woman, RMT, RH, INHA is a Psychic Medium, Spiritual Teacher, ordained Spiritual  Minister, and a Holistic Health Practitioner. Even though she is a natural born Healer, her continued education, training and certification in multiple Healing Modalities reflects that Healing is an on going process. She is the Owner of Goldylocks Temple of Healing, llc located in Groton, CT and has clients located all over the world.

Goldylocks Productions is a subdivision of Goldylocks Temple of Healing, llc. Tiffany produces Radio and TV Shows for those in the Holistic Profession.

Tiffany created the Holistic Healing Community. This is a community where other Holistic Practitioners can promote their services, products, and interact with other spiritually aware members of the community. Join today for FREE!

www.goldylocksproductionsct.com

http://www.holistichealingcommunity.ning.com

Topic: Where Do I Start with my Holistic Health?

Tiffany will discuss Daily Essential Nutrients required for a Transformational Habit of Health.

http://www.whitesagewoman.com/Nature-s-Sunshine-Products.html

No callers for this show. However, this is an interactive show. You are encouraged to Chat in the Chat Room. Questions about health and wellness can be asked (and answered) in the Chat.

Listen to the Live Radio Show and participate in Chat, via computer, here:http://www.blogtalkradio.com/goldylocksproductions/2016/03/02/spiritual-insight

 

 

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